Instructional Concurrent Session VI

Date/Time: Sunday, October 6, 2019 - 7:30 AM to 9:30 AM
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I got an OBI Makeover at ASHT! Incorporating Occupation-Based Intervention (OBI) in Your Clinic

Description:

This short course aims to describe how shifting hand therapy practice toward occupation based intervention (OBI) is possible, using our outpatient hand therapy center’s experiences in making this transition as a guide. OBI has a formative role to play in the treatment of clients with upper extremity, orthopedic injury or disease process. Emphasis of treatment is often on time-sensitive needs of the healing structures, however, incorporating occupation as both intervention and goal adds tremendous value in collaborating with patients to regain participation in meaningful life activities. OBI is of growing interest but can be perceived as challenging to implement. In this short course, we share the experiences of our outpatient hand therapy department’s gradual shift to incorporate OBI into daily practice. Current evidence supporting the use of OBI in hand therapy is described. Next, we discuss how to identify clients’ occupational limitations, including starting the occupational conversation, selecting assessment tools, or more insightfully using current ones. Then ‘the occupational makeover’ is detailed— inexpensively revamping one’s treatment toolbox for maximum OBI capacity. Next, we will highlight occupation-based interventions relevant to three client populations often seen in hand therapy practice. Candid conversation about some of the challenges encountered will follow.

Objective(s):

  • Identify 2 ways to determine clients' occupation/participation needs
  • Identify 3 ways to remodel your hand therapy practice for occupation/participation centricity
  • Identify occupation/participation principals relevant to three client populations.

Pearls and Pitfalls of Successful Grant Writing

Description:

This interactive course will help clinicians and academicians interested in getting started in funded research projects. Participants will have an opportunity to hear from experienced grant writers and reviewers on how to construct a proposal that includes relevant information required during the review process. All steps of successful grant writing will be addressed to allow conceptualization and design of a fund-able study. Topics will include posing a focused research question, writing a justification for the study, identifying appropriate study methods, anticipating results, time lines, and formulating and justifying a budget. The discussion will include how to describe the study environment, collaborating with others, and day-to-day planning and management of a study. Internet sources for proposal writing skills will be provided. Published articles of funded studies will be used to demonstrate the link between the proposal and ultimate success of application. Participants will engage in activities to promote skills for the development of clinical research proposals and grant applications for the pursuit of funding. The target population being clinicians at all levels of experience with grant writing, from the novice to the experienced researcher. Participants are invited to bring project ideas for the active part of the presentation.

Objective(s):

  • Participants will describe the components of a successful research grant application.
  • Participants will identify personal strengths and weaknesses for writing grant and be able to offer strategies to overcome obstacles.
  • Participants will demonstrate ability to apply course information via grant-writing exercises.

Rehabilitation in Hand Transplantation: Clinical Reasoning to Optimize Outcomes

Description:

Hand transplantation is still an investigational intervention for upper limb loss. However, the number of centers offering transplantation are ever-increasing. The AOTA has also identified hand transplantation as an emerging practice area for occupational therapists. As the number of centers offering this life-changing procedure increases, the need for informed practitioners will also increase. The complexity of rehabilitation following hand transplantation cannot be understated and informed clinical reasoning must be at the forefront of decisions. Unfortunately, there is very little direct evidence upon which to base clinical decisions. Generally, the session's aim is to provide the experienced therapist with the knowledge of how to approach the rehabilitation process with a patient who has undergone hand transplantation. The session will consist of an historical review of hand transplantation, surgical techniques used, evaluation of the transplanted hand, precautions, biomechanics, principles of motor learning and motor control, wound care, edema management, and orthotic positioning to optimize function. This session is not meant for the novice therapist.

Objective(s):

  • Describe the rationale for orthotic positioning post transplantation
  • Discuss how to synergize/generalize available information to best inform practice
  • Explain how to apply the principles of motor learning to a transplant patient
  • Evaluate tendon balanace in the hand post-surgically

Surgical Considerations, Rehabilitation Principles and Lymphedema Prevention in the Breast Cancer Population: Collaborative Care is Key

Description:

This session will examine the importance of collaborative care in the breast cancer population. Surgical interventions will be explored, highlighting how surgical interventions impact rehabilitation progression post operatively. Rehabilitation evaluation and treatment principles will be discussed noting important concepts which are associated with reducing the risk of lymphedema and other negative sequelae in this population.

Objective(s):

  • Attendees will be able to identify restrictions post operatively in patients post breast reconstruction.
  • Attendees will be able to recognize evidence-based evaluation and treatment principles associated with best outcomes in the breast cancer population.
  • Attendees will be able to identify risk factors associated with the development of lymphedema and axillary web syndrome in the breast cancer population.